FAQ for vision improvement by Hormetism

Three of my most popular articles are about how to restore your eyesight naturally and liberate yourself from glasses or contact lenses:

I call my general method “Hormetism” — the application of incremental stress to improve health.  While this approach has some similarities to other natural vision improvement methods, what is unique here is how the method is organized around the central principle of applying graduated, incremental defocus stress to induce progressive improvement over time.

Hormetism is the precise opposite of the current standard of care for correcting vision.  Minus lenses are prescribed to provide immediate relief and “correct” a refractive error in the eye — usually a combination of axial lengthening and thickening or spasm of the crystalline lens.  But despite the immediate relief, this approach provides a “crutch” that induces a compensation in the eye that makes the myopia grow worse over time.  The method of Hormetism essentially reverses the process by using focusing techniques or plus lenses to restore the original shape of the eye and accommodative ability of the lens. The above linked blog posts delve into theory and experimental evidence for my method.

Vision improvement by Hormetism is also the single most popular topic on my Discussion Forum, and I’m so pleased to hear from many that these articles have helped them to reduce or even eliminate their dependence on glasses — without resorting to laser eye surgery.

But I get a constant stream of questions asking for clarifications about how to proceed.  I often find myself answering the same questions again and again.

So I’m writing this post to provide an “FAQ”:   Answers to frequently asked “practical ” questions about how to apply this method to get results and improve your vision.  I have tried to boil it down to a simple, step-by-step method.  The information and ideas summarized here are based upon my personal experience, what has worked for others, and my understanding of the science of vision.  I am not providing medical advice, so take responsibility for your own health.

Q1.  How do I start if I am myopic (nearsighted) and can focus close up, but the distance is blurry? 

A1.  Follow this five step process if you are myopic:

  1. Note your Snellen score. First go to the ISEE Website and print out a Snellen chart.  (That’s one of those eye charts you use in the doctor’s office or DMV to test your vision, like the one in the image below).  Hang it on the wall in a well lit area and mark off a line 20 feet back from the wall.  Cover each eye separately and note the lowest line for which you can correctly read all the letters.For example if it is Line 3 for your left eye and Line 4 for your right eye, your Snellen score is 20/70 (L) and 20/50 (R).  The second number after the slash represents the distance that a normal person would have to stand at to see in focus the line that you can see at 20 feet back.  Note that score, because it is your baseline against which to track improvement.Snellen chart
  2. Note your diopter correction.  This is the first number on your prescription, also called the spherical aberration.  Ignore for now all the other numbers after the first — these relate to astigmatism or cylindrical aberration.  (More about that later).  OD is the right eye and OS is the left eye.  So for example, if your prescription is
    ..
    OD -3.00 -0,.50 x 95
    OS -2.50 -1.00 x 93
    ..
    Then your myopia can be summarized as:
    ..
    -3.00/-2.50
    ..
    What are diopters?  Well, 100 divided by the minus diopter number is the approximate distance (in centimeters) that you can see clearly in focus with each eye.  Since there are 39.4 inches per meter, then in inches that would be 39.4 divided by the diopters.  So a person with the above prescription can see
    ..
    39.4/3 = about 13 inches with the right eye
    39.4/2.5 = about 16 inches with the left eye
    ..
    Your Snellen score and diopter correction have different meanings, so you can’t translate from one to the other.  However, if you don’t have your diopter correction, you may find this chart useful in making an approximate translation between Snellen and diopters.
    ..Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 1.43.24 PM..
  3. Use print pushing to reduce myopia.  Print pushing is a method that involves “active focusing”.  It is not a matter of passively wearing special lenses.  It requires conscientious awareness of the reach of your focus and an intentional effort to increase that reach by “nudging” it. If your myopia is stronger than -2 diopters or 20/150 in both eyes, then you cannot see normal print in focus beyond about 20 inches.  So you can proceed to do “print pushing” without any glasses or contacts — just your naked eyes.  The idea behind print pushing is to read right at the limit of your focal distance, and to systematically push that distance to become farther and farther away. Print pushing is something you integrate into your normal routine of reading printed matter or computer screens.  About 5 years ago, I defined three distances to keep in mind while print pushing:
    ..

    D1. The ‘edge of focus’ – the furthest distance for myope (or closest for a hyperope) where a printed letter is completely in focus
    D2. The ‘edge of blur’ – the distance just beyond the edge of focus, where the slightest blur in the letter can just be detected
    D3. The ‘edge of readability’ – the furthest distance where you can intelligibly recognize each letter.

    ..
    Now D1 and D2 are going to be VERY close, almost exactly the same distance. If you are reading at D1, and you push the print slightly away less than an inch, you are immediately at D2. And if you are at D2 and get the tiniest distance closer, you are back at D1 again.You should spend the vast majority of your time reading at D1, in perfect focus, but continually (every few minutes), testing yourself by “pushing” into to D2. That’s because D1 is a dynamic distance, constantly changing.  It depends on lighting conditions, how alter or tired you feel, and other factors.  And you never want to be reading at D3 — that is needless stress on your eyes.The whole idea of print pushing is to keep increasing D1 and D2 so that your range of focus increases.  Once your myopia weakens sufficiently, go to Step 4.

  4. If your myopia is mild (less than about -2 diopters), you should print push with plus plus lens racklenses.
    Once your myopia is -2 or less, you can easily read a book or computer at arms’ length — at up to about 19-20 inches (half a meter) — without glasses.  So you aren’t effectively increasing D1 and D2 any more. That’s when you need to start using “anti-corrective” lenses to make your eyes work harder, by bring D1 and D2 closer.  This is analogous to wearing ankle weights to increase leg strength when you go for a run.  This technique is sometimes known as “plus lens therapy”.Unlike minus lenses, which have concave curvature to “correct” myopia, plus lenses have a convex shape like a magnifying glass, making it easier to see objects up close.  But this also brings D2 closer, making it harder to focus in the distance.  And this is precisely what makes them useful for increasing D2 beyond 20 inches.
    ..
    Plus lenses are sometimes called reading glasses or “readers”, mainly to help people with hyperopia or presbyopia read with greater ease.  But you are going to use them for the opposite purpose — for making it harder to focus in the distance.To choose the right strength of plus lens, I recommend making a trip to your local pharmacy or department store, where these “readers” are sold on rotating racks, like those pictured to the right.Try on various pairs to find one that allows you to read comfortably at about 15-20 inches, but begins to blur beyond that.  As a rule of thumb,  your “effective” diopters will be that of your current diopters minus that of of the plus lens you wear.   So if you have worked your way to a -0.75 prescription, you’ll need to wear a +1.25 pair of reading glasses to make it seem like you have -2.00 diopter myopia. So try on the +1.25 pair to see how that works.
    ..
    Wear these reading glasses for at least part of the time you read each day.  How much time?  To be effective, I would say about 1-2 hours per day while reading.  You can use them more if you are comfortable.  But rest is important, so it is very important to follow these guidelines:
    ..
    – Take frequent breaks every 15-30 minutes or so, removing the glasses to look at objects near and far
    – Stop if you get tired, or if your eyes get sore or red
    – Use plus lenses only for reading and close work.
    ..
    Plus lenses will create too much blur for distance activities. (See point 5 below).As your myopia reduces, you will want to replace these plus lenses with stronger plus lenses.  Once you get higher than about +2.5, there is no need to go any higher.
    ..
  5. Use under-correction for distance activities. When not reading or doing close work, you can provide further stimulus to myopia reversal by wearing slightly under-corrected glasses or contacts when at work, watching TV, sitting in lectures, or other distance viewing.  This means ordering a pair of lenses that are about 0.25 to 0.5 diopters weaker than your original lenses. So to use the earlier example, for a starting of a prescription that reads:
    ..
    OD -3.00 -0,.50 x 9
    OS -2.50 -1.00 x 93
    ..
    You would replace these with the following under-corrected prescription, changing only the first numbers and leaving the others alone:
    ..
    OD -2.75 -0,.50 x 9
    OS -2.25 -1.00 x 93
    ..
    You wear these under-corrected lenses for a while (probably a few months) until your myopia is sufficiently reduced (by the combination of print pushing and wearing weaker distance lenses).  Then you order additional lenses with further reductions in the diopter correction.  When you are looking at distance objects, trace common objects with your eyes and observe fine features, especially lines and edges.  Vary your gaze near and far, and make this into a game.  Play with it!
    ..
    Fusing of double images. As your myopia reduces, you may have the experience that many have of “double vision” or ghosting.  This might seem alarming at first, but it is actually a sign of your ability to see objects more sharply!  I suggest watching the video on my post “Myopia: a modern yet reversible disease” for a good description of how to use a technique I call “fusing” to take advantage of double images:
    ..

    1. Find distant objects with sharp contrasting edges: telephone wires, tree branches, edges of buildings or signs
    2. Focus on the darker of the double image and away from the fainter image.  With time, the darker image will become darker, and the fainter image will fade away
    3. Eventually the double image with fuse into a single crisp image — very exciting!

    ..
    As your myopia reduces, you will start being able to see objects in perfect focus at increasing distances, even with your naked eye!  This is where the technique really pays off and it is exciting and even emotional to experience this.

Q2.  This all sounds great, but I have hyperopia (far sightedness) or presbyopia (reduced accommodation of the crystalline lens) that make it hard for me to read fine print or read up close?  What can I do about that?

A2. Well, if you understand the principle of how Hormetism works to reduce myopia, you should be able to answer that question if you think about it for a moment?  What do you think the answer is?  That’s right — it’s the same method applied in the opposite direction!

When you read, instead of print pushing do “print pulling”.  Define D1, D2 and D3 by moving inward from perfect focus starting at D1.  Generally you can print pull with your naked eye.  Get as close as you can to read at D1, and test yourself frequently by getting closer to the text.  And try to test yourself on finer and finer print.  You can also print out a near vision test card from the I-SEE website  It’s basically a Snellen chart for people with hyoperopia or presbyopia. (It is on the final page of that link, after the standard Snellen chart for distance vision).

Another cool way to improve near vision is to use the “convergence” method of Ray Gottieb.  You can print out his chart and directions from the I-SEE Website.  This is a bit tricky and involves learning to allow your eyes to relax enough that they “cross” slightly.  Not everyone can do this.  It took me a while to make it work for me, but once I got it it was like magic!  Try it, it may or may not work for you.

Q3. My myopia correction is much stronger in one eye than the other. How do I apply your method?

A3.  If  the prescriptions for your right and left eyes are within 0.5 diopters of each other (as in the above example), then you should not have any difficulty doing print pushing. But if they differ by more than 0.5 diopters, then your D2 can be more than a few inches different for the right and left eyes.  So you can’t find a single distance for print pushing that will work for both eyes.

As we age, it is common to develop a condition called “mono vision” where the eyes tend to specialize — one is better at distance, one for close work.  This is the case with me, where my right eye has perfect distance vision but some presbyopia close up, whereas the the left eye is much sharper close up but 20/40 for distance.  The two eyes work very well together, but I keep pushing each eye to improve where it is weak.  I do print pushing with my left eye and print “pulling” with my right eye, as explained in the answer to Question 2 above.

WinkIn such a case, I would advise to work on the eye with a higher degree of myopia first.  But to do that you have to prevent your better “stronger” eye from doing the work, so that your “weaker” eye is forced to improve.  There are several alternative ways to selectively work on just your weaker eye, depicted in the diagram to the right::

  1. Patch. One way to do that is to tape some paper over the lens of the stronger eye.  I recommend using wax paper or tracing paper that diffuses the image and prevent focusing, but lets in enough light to keep your pupil from constricting, so you don’t have to readjust to the light when removing the glasses. Patching is convenient, but you may feel it looks too awkward or “nerdy” in public.
  2. Shield.  I personally like this method when reading for a long time.. Hold one hand with thumb against nose, and tilt at a 45 degree angle to block the stronger eye’s direct view of text, but still allow light in.  Your strong eye will be “looking” at the backside of your tilted hand, but your brain will fill in the gap and “see” what your weak eye sees on the page you are reading.
  3. Wink.  This is similar to shielding, but is leaves both hands free and is the least “conspicuous”.  At first, you may find it tiresome to hold one eye blinked shut, but it is amazing how much easier and almost effortless this becomes with practice.  I can blink one eye shut for 5 minutes without any problem.  And I periodically “flash” it open every minute or so to keep the pupil from shutting down.  This is something you can even do while driving because there is no issue of reaction time to open both eyes.

Q4.  Glasses are expensive. Do I have to keep buying new pairs of glasses as my vision improves? 

A4.  I agree that it would be costly to have to buy a new pair of glasses every time your vision improves.  There are two alternatives I can recommend if you want to save money and are willing to compromise a bit on style:

  1. Buy some inexpensive glasses online.  There are many vendors, but a reliable one is: zennioptical.com.  They have a wide range of choices of frames, including some under $20, and you can just input your prescription.  It is then relatively painless to order additional pairs with successively weaker corrections.
  2. Buy adjustable lenses.  You can buy these from adlens.com or eyejusters.com. Adjustable lenses have the advantage that you can continuously alter the prescription so that it is fine tuned to what you need.  Some adjustable lenses can be adjusted both as plus lenses for print pushing, and under-corrected minus lenses for distance activities, and even minus lenses for print pulling.  I have been experimenting with using them to work on reducing the extent of my own mono vision (slight myopia in the left eye and slight presbyopia/hyperopia in the right eye).  This is a nice all-purpose solution.  The main downside is that these glasses have a somewhat reduced field of vision and tend to have a little bit of distortion that can be annoying.  But very practical.

For the record, I have absolutely no connection or financial interest in any of these sites, or any product whatsoever. I have myself purchased glasses from both Aennioptical and Adlens and have been satisfied, but I make no promises or claims as to how well these products will work for you.  But they are cheap enough that you can afford to experiment and to work through several stages of improvement without spending a bundle of money.

Q5. I have very strong myopia (usually between -6 to -12 diopters).  Will this method work for me or is it hopeless? How long will it take me to get to 20/20?

A5.  The Hormetism method can work no matter how strong your myopia or how old you are.  But you need to be realistic.  It took you many years to become myopic, and it will require patience, consistency and time to undo the damage.  The rate of improvement varies  a lot and depends on many factors, including age, genetics, and diet — and very much on your own consistency and persistence.  Some people can reduce 2 diopters in a year.  Others, only 0.5 diopters per year.

My experience– and that of many who have shared their experience on the Discussion Forum — is that improvements do not occur at a steady rate.  Rather, you will improve in sudden, unpredictable spurts.  You may see absolutely no improvement for weeks – and then one day you find yourself more easily reading books, or you can clearly see flowers in full focus on the other side of the room.  So be patient if you don’t make any progress in the first few weeks, or if you stall after a few months.

And let’s be clear also that some people make a concerted effort and never improve.  But there is really not much downside to trying, right? And you are not exposing yourself to the risks of other more invasive and “irreversible”  methods like laser eye surgery.

At the very least, you may stabilize your vision and stop the further progression of myopia.  Otis Brown champions this as “myopia prevention” and works with young people and their parents to help them stall myopia before it becomes serious.

Don’t minimize the potential impact of diet.  Cordain’s research indicates that the standard American diet, high in sugar and industrial oils, low in fiber, omega-3 oils, and phytonutrients is likely a strong contributor to the myopia epidemic.  I found that when I went on a mostly Paleo diet, my visual acuity sharpened, and I notice that consuming cod liver oil and more brightly pigmented vegetables induced a dramatic brightening in colors at the red and purple end of the spectrum, and better night vision.  If you practice hormetic eye exercises, but eat a lousy diet, you may be working at cross-purposes to your goal of improved vision.

Q6. I have astigmatism.  Will this method help me?

A6. Astigmatism often reduces spontaneously as myopia is corrected.  That is what I found in my own case.  But you may also wish to experiment with specific astigmatism reduction exercises such advocated by Leo Angart, such as tracing with your eyes the spokes of the Tibetan wheel, or the the similar Astigmatism Wheel used by followers of the Bates Method.  I don’t follow the general approach of either Angart or Bates, but happily borrow specific techniques where they prove useful.

I think that the above six questions account for about 90% of the questions I receive via individual correspondence or see posted as comments to previous posts or on the Discussion Forum.  For those who wish to take a deeper dive, I encourage you to head over to the discussion forum and peruse the many insightful discussions on vision improvement, mostly on the this popular board:

Discussion Forum: 亚搏体育客户端下载

If your questions still are not answered by this blog post or what you find on the Discussion Forum, go ahead and start a new three to ask the question or describe your  experience.  I see a lot of good ideas over there and am constantly learning and tweaking my own approach.

Happy seeing!

 

 

 

 


105 Comments

  1. Van

    Todd
    I really like your method, but there is a problem I found in recent days. I got a little bit high diopter which means I have to stick very close to focus. That’s a kind of torture on my neck. And, well, I have to say that reading efficiency is greatly reduced, I was distracted to think of this method(print-push). I can continue to try this method, but I’m afraid I can’t keep up with my study.

    Reply
    • Todd

      How high is your diopter correction? If higher than about -4, you can print push using a prescription reduced by 2-3 diopters. Or if you wear contact lenses, you can wear plus lens glasses over your contacts.

      There is always a way to get to a comfortable viewing distance. You want to use minus or plus lenses to get to D2 of around 15-20″ to make it easy to read and print push.

      Reply
    • Ephraim

      When practising print-pushing with a computer, you could simply increase the text-size so that you don’t have to get so close to the screen.

      Reply
      • Todd

        It’s a good point and excellent suggestion, Ephraim. On most computers and many applications it is fairly easy to adjust the font size. For example on a Mac you can use the Command and + key combination to increase font size and Command with – to decrease font size. For Windows its (CTRL +) to increase and (CRTL -) to decrease. And with a mouse, you can just slide the mouse while holding the CTRL key to enlarge the entire screen, or reverse the effect.

        The key with font size adjustment–as with using the naked eye, plus lenses, strongly reduced minus lenses–is to find the precise point at which you are at the limit of D! and the threshold of D2.

        Reply
        • OlivierKD

          Are D1 and D2 totally relative distances based solely on readability? Are there also D1 and D2 thresholds when reading distant wall adverts in the street, or would the eye-muscles stop exercising because of that few meters distance?

          Reply
          • Todd

            Olivier,

            Yes, D1 and D2 are subjectively determined, not by readability (that’s D3) but rather by perception of sharpness or blur of high contrast image features. Those features can be parts of letters, or shapes, or even objects like thin wires against light backgrounds. So D1 and D2 will be longer distances for larger fonts or features, such as the billboard advertisements in your example.

            As a practical matter, since we spend much of our time reading computers or books, the detgrmintation of D1 and D2 will be based on typical sized fonts encountered in your life.

            Also, to clarify, the two elements of the eye that determine net focal length are the axial length of the eye, and the thickness and curvature of the lens, and its ability to accommodate. The lens changes shape by means of the ciliary muscles. The eye has its own “extra-ocular” muscles, but these are mainly used to change the direction of your gaze up-and-down and side-to-side, not to adjust or accommodate where you focus.

            Reply
  2. kid

    It will be slightly off topic, but just wondering, after reading some of your posts – do you know any hormetic method of improving your hearing, especially when it’s sensorineural hearing loss? I can understand how your method can work with myopia but I don’t suppose the same is possible with hearing loss…

    Reply
  3. Raquel

    Hi Todd
    It’s been a couple months I’m into reducing my myopia. I have – 3.5 on each eye (-4 previously but it was due to ovecorrection, which I addresses a year ago without knowing anything about myopia, only about my own eye strain with the super new glasses that were in fact giving me too much sharpness). Three months ago I got a reduced prescription for my glasses, or – 2.5 each eye, that’s one diopter less. I’ve been using them and some days I would see a bit blurry, some days I would see amazingly sharp. Some days I can barely read 20/20, can read 20/40, and some others I read quite well 20/20 but never cristal clear.

    Anyway, a few days ago I started to experience something: when not wearing my glasses at all, and trying to watch some TV I was capable of, sometimes, clear the image to the point of reading sharp letters (where I normally see just blur, not even readable) but it was accompanied by double (or triple) vision. Sometimes the bold image was sharp and the faint was blurry, sometimes the opposite.

    Since yesterday I’m experiencing this double image or ghosting even with glasses on, even on distances I would see sharp. Am I doing something wrong and causing too much strain? or is it indeed how it is supposed to be? there was maybe some blur that I considered sharp, that has now cleared and turned into double vision that I have to fuse?

    I’m a bit confused, and dunno I I should be happy or scared about this double vision thing.

    Hope you can enlighten me a bit on this topic.

    Amazing blog BTW. Lots of amazing information.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Raquel,

      The day-to-day fluctuations you see in visual sharpness are quite typical. Your eyes are trying to change, stick with it and the improvements should become more consistent with time.

      The double vision is a good sign! This is something I experienced and many others experienced as a precursor to significant reduction in myopia. Go back up to the article and read the section called “Fusing of double images” under Part 5 of the answer to Question 1. If you watch my YouTube talk, skip to the 22 minute mark and you’ll see a fuller description of how you can take advantage of the double image or “ghosting” to more rapidly reduce your myopia.

      If you still have questions after reading that section and watching the full video, let me know.

      Good luck — and I’m excited for you!

      Todd

      Reply
      • Raquel

        Hey Todd, thanks for your super quick response! It’s great to have feedback from someone who has accomplished a myopia reversal journey.

        I read your mentioned post and watched the video. My concern was that I was in fact seeing ghosting or double image where I would see sharp before, and it worried me. I didn’t print push that far into the blur today and it has cleared. Now I’m just print pushing until there is a tiny bit of blur, nor further.

        I read some comments from this Bill person that did what I’ve been doing but for weeks and he had the double vision problem as well, for what I understood from his comments.

        I think I will not put that much stress and go step by step to avoid ‘overtraining’ and causing too much strain.

        I’ll be doing this actively and I will go to my optometrist in a few weeks so I can evaluate the progress. She’s quite nice and was OK with giving me a reduced prescription to avoid strain in mid distance (I didn’t tell her the full story about myopia reversion) but if there is a minimal improvement I will explain her hoping she will support me.

        I will keep you updated here.

        Thank you so much!

        Reply
  4. bana

    Hello Todd,

    I can still read closeup but do a lot of near-work. I only recently discovered my sight is not as good as it used to be. Could this be caused by these bad habits (sitting behind computer and smartphone?). I wonder if I should get plus lenses immediately (and if so, where should I start? I mean, what lenses to get). Right now, I can practice reading from a distance, say 2.5meters from my PC, but wonder if this is a good technique.

    Thank you

    Reply
    • Todd

      Yes – bad reading habits are a major contributor to myopia. Watch my video: Myopia, a modern yet reversible disease

      Reading from 2.5 meters is rather inconvenient, don’t you think? Read the article, go to the pharmacy, and find the right plus lenses to bring D2 in closer–as described above in Section 4 of the Answer to Question 1.

      Todd

      Reply
      • bana

        It is OK for me (using a wireless keyboard from a distance). I have been reading from about 2 meters, but my eyes got a bit tired from this after doing this for half a day. Would it be better to use plus lenses or just keep increasing distance? I would rather use the best method instead of the most convenient (also read some arguments on this forum advising against plus lenses, but I guess that comes down to proper use of the method).

        Inspiring video, watched it several times, thank you.

        Reply
        • Todd

          Hi bana,

          If reading at 2 meters works for you, that’s absolutely fine. I’m in favor of creativity and whatever works. Both distance and plus lenses are effective, so choose whatever you prefer. The net effect on your eye is very similar, if not identical.

          But don/t let your eyes get tired, sore or red! The point of Hormetism (not just for vision, but any change) is to find the magic point that balances sufficient stress against excessive stress. That’s as true with weight lifting as it is for vision improvement.

          What do you think?

          Todd

          Reply
          • bana

            I will continue this method and keep track of my Snellen. Now I’m aware of this, I tend to avoid near work. For example, I decided to not read books unless I can read them on a PC. You get a bit conscious of what will speed up or hinder your progress. I don’t like to do a lot of good work like reading from a distance only to have the effect diminished by reading real books. Like you said, key is to find a balance. I noticed light has a big effect on my reading ability (only starting to get aware now of how bad my vision really is).

            Reply
  5. mukesh jain

    My close vision in cm is around 20 to 24 inch.but my far vision is 20/40 to 20/30 is this normal

    Reply
    • Todd

      By “close vision” do you mean that anything closer than 20-24 inches is blurry? And also that your “far vision” gets blurry beyond about 20/40 (52 inches)?

      If so, then you probably have what is called “presbyopia”, or limited focal range brought on by stiffening of the crystalline lens of your eye. This is a very typical consequence of aging. The majority of people over 40 or 50 years of age have this condition.

      Read the answer to Question 2 above for suggestions on how to reduce your presbyopia in BOTH directions.

      Reply
  6. Ben

    Hi Todd,

    I am currently very fortunate in that I have very good eyesight (no myopia or hyperopia). I have been using the method you suggest of reading ‘on the edge of focus’ with plus lenses and have found, to my amazement, that things are even sharper. And this is after only a few weeks. I haven’t tested with a Snellen chart, but can clearly read car number plates from even further out then I could before.

    My question is: how would I go about maintaining this sharp distant vision whilst also counteracting the almost inevitable presbyopia when it kicks in? Apologies if you’ve answered this already, I did look through the comments and indeed what you mentioned to mukesh just above, but couldn’t work out what you’d do on a practical level. Would it be to alternate between print pushing and pulling? How would the plus lenses fit in with this? 🙂

    Reply
    • Todd

      Ben,

      You’re smart to realize that vision can not only be normalized but improved to “beyond normal”. You might enjoy this guest post by someone who was able to achieve 20/15 vision after reading my blog posts:

      //www.tennisbs.com/2012/04/how-one-person-improved-his-vision/

      Your question about presbyopia is a good one. As I turn 60 this year, I see that a majority of my peers need glasses, while I do fine with the eyes I was born with. I’ve held presbyopia at bay by the technique you hint at — incorporating print pushing and print pulling into my daily routine. Since I have a degree of so-called “monovision” (one eye more specialized for close vision, the other for distance), my net binocular vision is fine over the whole range of near to far, but I nevertheless “challenge” each eye separately to compensate for its individual weakness. I do this by winking or shielding as shown in the above photos. This is more of a prophylactic, to stay tuned up and maintain the greatest focal range possible. Occasionally I will use plus lenses, mostly as a preventive measure, when reading for very long periods. My main advice is to take frequent breaks from any close work, get up, walk around and look at objects near and far – similar to what my guest blogger suggests in the above-linked post.

      Reply
    • Todd

      Ben,

      You’re smart to realize that vision can not only be normalized but improved to “beyond normal”. You might enjoy this guest post by someone who was able to achieve 20/15 vision after reading my blog posts:

      //www.tennisbs.com/2012/04/how-one-person-improved-his-vision/

      Your question about presbyopia is a good one. As I turn 60 this year, I see that a majority of my peers need glasses, while I do fine with the eyes I was born with. I’ve held presbyopia at bay by the technique you hint at — incorporating print pushing and print pulling into my daily routine. Since I have a degree of so-called “monovision” (one eye more specialized for close vision, the other for distance), my net binocular vision is fine over the whole range of near to far, but I nevertheless “challenge” each eye separately to compensate for its individual weakness. I do this by winking or shielding as shown in the above photos. This is more of a prophylactic, to stay tuned up and maintain the greatest focal range possible. Occasionally I will use plus lenses, mostly as a preventive measure, when reading for very long periods. My main advice is to take frequent breaks from any close work, get up, walk around and look at objects near and far – similar to what my guest blogger suggests in the above-linked post.

      Reply
      • Ben

        Todd,

        Thanks for the thorough and informative reply. The article you link to was an inspiring read, too. I’m all about prevention and improvement even if the opticians decide my eyesight is ‘fine’.

        One thing I find particularly useful about the plus lenses rather than simply print pushing, for me, is that I do spend quite a lot of time at the computer. And with my eyesight as it is I would have to sit very far away from the monitor to reach the edge of focus. Too far for using the computer to be practical, at least. So that makes me wonder whether plus lenses could be used even at the onset of presbyopia, to maintain strong distance vision, or whether this would be counter-productive? Of course print pushing would need to be practiced as well. But perhaps at that stage the plus lenses would naturally become a more occasional thing, just to keep things as they are rather than try to improve further.

        Reply
  7. a.j.

    Firstly thanks for putting this info out there.

    I wear contacts and have myopia with -1.75 sphere for both eyes.

    My question is I’m going to use the print push method mostly at my computer. Instead of buying “anti-corrective” lenses can’t I just keep push my chair further away from the computer as the myopia improves?

    For improving distance viewing, instead of buying under corrective lenses, can’t I just go outside without wearing my contacts and look at power lines and building edges and over time it will gradually improve?

    Reply
    • Todd

      AJ,

      Yes, you can keep pushing your chair back further, You can also try reducing the font size on your computer using the appropriate commands for Mac or Windows.

      And going outside without your contacts to look at detailed features of the world is a WONDERFUL idea. It is also something enjoyable, and you will get the benefit of some exercise and a bit of sunlight – and maybe some joy from walking the dog or joining with a friend.

      Todd

      Reply
  8. Keith K.

    Concerning distance viewing prescriptions.

    You talk about the use of underpowered lenses for distance uses (such as using -5.00 lenses for a -7.00 diopter prescription).

    My question: does this same correction (using 1-2 diopters less than the prescribed level for distance work) also hold for contact lenses or should one use a different amount of diopter change from the optometrist prescribed level?

    Reply
    • Todd

      The correction for contacts is the same as for glasses. One way to inexpensively alter the corrective powder of contacts is to purchase inexpensive plus lens “reader glasses” and wear them over your contacts. Once your myopia reduces sufficiently, you are able to order to order a reduced prescription set of contacts.

      Reply
      • Hi Todd,
        Thank you for your articles which gives me the blief to throw away my glasses. But I just have one question . Could my eyes shrink to 25 millimeters again if I follow your ways to practice?Please reply me soon.Thank you.

        Reply
        • Todd

          It’s impossible for me to say. I don’t know the current length of your eyes.

          Reply
          • Lucy

            Dear Todd,
            Maybe my question is too difficult to answer. The current length of my eyes is 25.5.Ok,now let me share my confusion.
            As is known to all,the myopia is an ocular disease characterized by abnormal visual functions, caused by excessive axial elongation.Some experts said that the myopia couldn’t restore because the length of optic axis can’t shrink. And they also said that Ophthalmology shows after the age of 6 ,our eyes just like the parameter-fixed telescopes so that they have lost the growth potential. That makes me feel very confused. Here are my questions.
            1.If they are right,how can you change your vision?(the length of optic axis can’t shrink)In other words,have your eyes shrunken?
            2.According to some experts, practice our eyes without glasses may hurt eyes.Worse still,our eyes vision decreased faster. This is what I’m afraid.What can I do?
            That’ll thank you.looking forward to your reply.

            Reply
            • Todd

              I would like to see the studies showing conclusively that the eye can no longer change shape after age 6. That would make the eye unique among organs. Also, keep in mind that myopia is a function not just of axial length of the eye, but also of the shape of the lens and dynamic range of the ciliary muscle.

              Reply
      • Sophiesdichter@gmail.com

        Do you happen to know of an online retailer that sells contacts without needing a prescription? Like Zenni for glasses, except for contacts.

        Reply
        • Todd

          Sorry, I’ve not yet found any such online seller of custom contact lenses.

          Reply
    • Todd

      I wouldn’t make such a drastic change for distance. Cut down by at most 0.5 diopters at first, until your eyes adjust. You would find 2 diopters uncomfortable, I think.

      The same correction applies to contacts as to glasses. But you can also try wearing weak plus lens glasses OVER your contact lenses.

      Reply
  9. meena

    Hi todd
    I m trying doing it naked eye with =5 on each eye.is this the right way.I read books .isnt it over=exertion

    Reply
    • Todd

      Sounds like you are overdoing it. Read at the edge of focus or edge of blur and limit your print pushing to 1-2 hours per day maximum.

      Reply
  10. KC17

    Hi Todd,

    I have low myopia:

    Both eyes -1.25 sph. with -0.5 cyl (axis 172). I can’t find the blur point with just spherical lenses. I tried wearing a plus lens over my distance prescription and here we go – it is much easier to find the edge of blur. Doing that is not very comfortable. I will consider ordering new glasses online (with that astigmatism correction and a slight plus prescription).

    When I am at – what you call D2 -, the text clears (sometimes). Does it have to? Did you also experience clearing?

    And what shall I do with that astigmatism? Although I have low astigmatism, it does – unfortunately – make a HUGE difference when I do not correct it.

    Thank you. 🙂

    Reply
    • Todd

      For astigmatism, read the answer to Question 6 above in the blog post. Astigmatism is uncomfortable, yes, but you need to remove the crutch. If going cold turkey is just too hard for you, then weaken the strength of your cylindrical prescription (cut the -0.5 to -.25 and keep the 172 axis). But try the links I gave you to the Astigmatism Wheel and Tibetan Wheel.

      The principle of gradualism applies — you need to work with slight discomfort to remodel your eyes. Discomfort, but never pain or soreness. As with running, weight lifting, diet or any change, persistence is required before you can consolidate permanent improvement.

      Reply
    • Todd

      D2 is where the text starts to clear. Regarding astigmatism, read Question and Answer #6:
      //www.tennisbs.com/2016/03/faq-for-vision-improvement-by-hormetism/

      Reply
  11. Igor Bukanov

    Hi Todd,

    Would you recommend to read smallest possible letter size? Also, as I read on the phone I can change font color and background among other things. Any recommendation on those? I am asking because one of hypothesis on possible cause of myopia as a lack of blue component in indoor lighting.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Igor,

      Yes, small font size can be used as an alternative to sitting father back from the text. I don’t know the answer to your question about font and background colors. Why not try it yourself, experiment, and report back here on what you find?

      In all the above, take care not to push too hard. Eye strain and soreness are to be avoided. The point is to “nudge” your eyes to improve, not to beat them up. Take care of your eyes the way a runner or weight lifter takes care of their arms and legs, while pushing to get stronger.

      Todd

      Reply
  12. KC17

    Hi Todd,

    my new glasses will arrive soon (+1.00 with -0.25 cyl).

    Should I “calculate” D2 or how can I find it? I ask this because of that astigmatism, there is always blur, no matter which distance. And it does not clear up. (Btw: Does it have to?)

    My eyesight was measured twice:

    Normal: -1.25 sph, -0.5 cyl

    And later with drops (to eliminate accommodation) and the result was different on my left eye:

    Left: -1.00, cyl -1.00
    Right: -1.25, cyl -0.5

    Did you also have astigmatism? If so, did you also have difficulties to find D2? Especially my left eye has a significant amount of astigmatism. If I cover my right eye, I feel dizzy. And my left eye mostly feels “dry”, but I want the same amount of correction for both eyes.

    Reply
  13. James O

    Todd,

    Great website you have here and I particularly like all of the science behind all of the practices and the philosophy of hormetisism itself.

    I have been doing plenty of print pushing lately. Now I’m seeing ghosting a lot of the time. It’s not as pronounced as in your slides but I suppose that was for illustrative purposes. When I fuse the images, my eyes water quite a lot. I presume this will stop happening when fusing the images becomes more normal?

    Thanks

    James

    Reply
    • Todd

      Your eyes could water for different reasons, so I’m not sure about the connection with ghosting or fusing of images. But it would be good if you could write back and let us know if your attempts at fusing the ghosted images is leading towards dominance of one sharper image and fading of the ghosted image. That is what I noticed.

      Reply
      • James O

        I currently suffer from sinusitis which I suspect is causing my eyes to water. No doubt this is causing interference with my vision.

        There is definitely image fusing taking place. I do get sharp clear vision which is great, I can read the 20/30 line on a good day.

        Thanks again

        Reply
  14. John K

    I was wondering if using the Snellen chart to track your progress isn’t a flawed idea. If you test frequently with a Snellen chart, you might get really good at reading Snellen-charts (I know they’re supposed to measure visual acuity, but if you use even randomised versions too often, might you not just learn to make more sense out of limited visual information, instead of seeing actually sharper?). Wouldn’t it be more sensible to use adjustable glasses to figure out if your optimal diopter correction is reduced over time?

    Reply
  15. Amarilla

    Regarding test lens kits: I have been shopping around for a test lens kit, but I find as I look at pictures, especially on eBay, that it is unclear whether some of them include cylinder lenses. In some cases, they appear to have a shorter row of minus lenses included, but it isn’t specifically labeled as cylinders. Who here has experience buying lens kits, and do you ever find they lack cylinders? I ask because I have low myopia and high astigmatism, so the cylinders are crucial, or else I’m spending an equal amount on “replacement lenses” for the 16ish cylinder lenses which I need. 😉 Thanks for any help on this!

    Also, I created a login for this site through WordPress, but it doesn’t seem to work over in the forum. I don’t know what I might be doing wrong. Thanks!

    I am so glad this blog and forum exist!

    Reply
  16. Kshitij

    Sir,I am highly myopic with -7 on left eye and -8.50 on right eye..I am 21 now and I m wearing glasses from past 11 years with starting prescription of about -3.50 ..I know that due to constant wearing of such high negative lenses my myopia rapidly increased to -8.50..I read your article of reversing myopia which gave me new hope of reversing myopia which doctors denied..

    Sir, let me know exactly what process should I follow for print pushing and distance focusing as I am highly myopic and I will not be able to read with reading glasses…SIr I am ready to wear under prescription lenses and practice everything… Kindly just guide me through the process.

    Sir, Kindly help me out on this..I will be highly thankful to you..

    Waiting for your response! 🙂

    Reply
  17. Chris

    Hello Todd,

    Thank you for writing the FAQs blog posts and running this website. I regularly visit your website. I am aware that it mainly revolves around yabo亚洲 /Hormetism. Now, I’ve read your blog posts and I went through every one of your personal posts on the forum and others’ but there are still a few questions remaining regarding the application of yabo亚洲 to eyesight improvement and I would appreciate if you could provide your insights.

    1. Edge of blur – I’m at -1.5 so if I were +2 lenses over my bare eyes I can see clearly up to around 30 cm so I push towards what you call the “edge of blur”. I then focus on letting the text clear or clearing it with a few blinks. The text eventually clears and by that I mean it becomes clearer than before. So after it clears am I supposed to push back further more until I reach a point where the text doesn’t clear and that’s where I stay?

    2. Point of failure – When working out at the gym, for example, I can tell very well where’s the point of failure. If I want to grow muscle I use a weight that I can lift at least 6 times and I lift it up and down until I reach a rep where I can’t do it no more. At the end of my workouts my muscles are pumped but I know I can’t push them more and allow for rest. Now with eyesight I don’t understand the point of failure. Am I supposed to do print pushing until my eyes feel tired or it becomes uncomfortable to keep print pushing?

    3. The rest of the day – say after a 2 – 3 hour session of print pushing I might still need to do some work focused up close on my laptop or doing some reading. What did you do back when you were improving? Did you keep pushing the print without plus lenses? Did you just read where it was clear and forget about your eyes?

    4. Rest – If I workout my arms, for example, I usually don’t have to keep lifting heavy weights the rest of the day so I can still use them and won’t be applying that much stress, if any. But with eyes I can’t just “forget” about them, if you will, I still have to use them the entire day after print pushing. So what do I to rest them? just loosely see whatever I can see?

    5. Distance – you mention that one should try to see things far away and bring them into focus. How did you do that? Just by looking at things that are somwewhat blurry and letting them clear up? or by blinking?

    I would really appreciate your response Todd and again thank you for sharing your experience.

    Reply
  18. Jason

    I’m not sure how reducing font size on a display, instead of changing distance or lenses, is supposed to help with active focus and print pushing. If you don’t change the distance or refraction, then the focal plane remains in the same position and would not result in hyperopic defocus. Decreasing the size of the letters on a computer display might more easily reveal blur at that distance, as it does on a Snellen chart, but it’s merely simulating distance by means of trigonometry (subtending a smaller angle) and not stimulating the retina for axial shortening.

    Another problem is the majority of computer displays have resolutions around 100 PPI and aren’t sharp compared to ink on paper. To overcome this Microsoft Windows uses ClearType/DirectWrite (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ClearType) font scaling and anti-aliasing technology to make the text intentionally less sharp by using subpixel rendering (intentional color fringing) to increase recognizability. In other words, instead of text being black on white with high contrast, the display may appear black, blue, and brown against white, tan and pink (for example).

    The benefit of ClearType is to make curves and diagonals look smoother and to increase weight/thickness without increasing size and proportion. However, reducing font size necessarily reduces sharp, high contrast edges and creates an inherent appearance of blurriness or chromatic aberration that cannot be resolved optically. Wouldn’t this tend to cause more eyestrain with print pushing as the eye attempts to resolve something that is as unresolvable as a blurry photograph? Could this blurriness approximate form deprivation and induce maladjustment?

    The obvious solution is to turn ClearType off, but the problem of focal distance remains. Not to mention there are other issues with computer monitors when it comes to contrast and sharpness.

    At least, that’s my understanding. I could be wrong.

    Reply
  19. Bryan J

    Hi Todd,
    update for august.
    I am currently wearing L -3.00 R -3.50 contacts. I noticed when I put on glasses of the same prescription there is a bit more blur, I’m guessing it is due to the glasses not being right on my eyes. Just something I noticed.
    I started correcting my eyes on January 1st so 8 months in and I’ve went from L -4.75 and R -5.25 to I’m guessing L -3.5 and R -4… It has slowed down now. looks like I might reach the my goal of L-3.00/R-3.50 ish range by dec/jan.

    FYI for everyone starting… it is super slow… but worth it. I can now find things with my naked eye from farther away. your eyes take a while to reshape and get back its flexibility. U want it to be slow in reality. cause once u get it were u want it, you want it to be hard to change.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Thanks for the good update, Bryan. And the good advice about patience!

      Everyone wants a quick fix. But shouldn’t we prefer a sustainable fix? It puts things in perspective to realize that if it takes years to get into a myopic state via gradual remodeling of the eye’s shape, it is unrealistic to expect the eye to suddenly reverse the process in days or weeks.

      The other thing that has helped me is to look at print pushing not as burdensome “exercise” but merely as something to fit into the daily routine. If you are reading at the edge of blur, you are still reading in near focus, so that’s not so different from normal reading. It’s not uncomfortable if you are doing it right. And if you are taking breaks and looking at nature as you walk – that’s pleasant, not bothersome.

      Let’s be happy that the myopia can be reversed at all! And learn to enjoy the process of getting back to normal vision.

      Todd

      Reply
      • Bryan J

        Update for Dec 2016

        Thank you for your reply Todd,
        I’m still chugging along, doing very well.
        My contacts are L-2.75 R-3.00 today. I’m seeing 20/30 on my snellen with these. I just bumped down today. my process seems to be working very well for me. I’m avging .25 off every two to three months, which is above avg I think. The end of jan, my next drop should be L-2.5 R-3.00. My Eyes are not even about .35 difference in them.(I only bump down one eye at a time.) but at this stage with my naked eye they seem more different then when I started, but if you look at the the inches diagram on your site, the 2.50 diopter inches length is 16 inches and 3.00 length is 13 inches. And when I started at 4.75 and 5.25. the length was closer like, 8.2 inches and 7.5 inches. So as I get them better the difference between them will grow. For a second I thought my right eye was not moving…. but it is moving at the same pace as my left. I only bump one eye down at a time because they are more then .25 but less then .5 difference. It also gives one eye a rest in between bump downs.

        I try and explain how this is done to people and they just don’t believe me. My Wife even sees my progress and it just doesn’t give her the drive to fix her eyes. What I’ve come to find out about people if they don’t have the drive or the discipline to put in the work they will take an easy way out and say it is BS. It takes about 21 days to start or stop a habit, and making this process a habit is what it takes to keep your eyes on the prize…. pun intended.

        I’m looking at another year and a half at this rate of gain. Sept 2018… much sooner then I thought so if it take a few more months it wont be to bad. but since I’ve had glasses since I was 9, a year and a half doesn’t seem hard. age 33 now.

        later

        Reply
        • Todd

          Great to hear of your progress, Bryan. You sure hit the nail on the head – drive and discipline are essential to making progress over many months with this technique.

          Please do come back and post any updates.

          Todd

          Reply
  20. Sankhayan

    Sir,

    I am wearing my glasses since i was 18 years. According to the latest prescription my left eye is -3.00 and my right eye is -2.00. and i’m 21 years now. i have made a weaker prescription of -2.75 for left and -1.75 for my right.

    I have recently watched your video on YouTube and started the print pushing technique for a week. And also doing the image fusing technique(especially with the moon on a full moon night is pretty amazing).

    You have mentioned to use the lower prescribed glasses for going on a walk or while travelling. But i really don’t like to wear my glasses. so when i am travelling or when i am in the gym or out with friends, i don’t wear glasses or contact lenses at all. will that be a problem??

    I read my books in between D1 and D2 without my glasses but while working on computer due to the bright light emission i wear my lower prescribed glasses. Is that Okay??

    These are my two quarries. I’ll be waiting for your response.

    Thank You

    Reply
  21. Rafey

    Hi,

    I am a 14 year old boy and have had glasses since I was 9, which is 5 years. I am myopic with a prescription of L:-4 and R:-4.5. I am thinking I should get glasses of a prescription of -3.75 for both eyes. Do you think this is okay? Also, since I am a kid, would my eyes change shape faster?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Todd

      Yes, the slightly weaker prescription that you suggest should be OK. But you might consider -4.0 for the right eye, since a change of more than 0.5 might cause too much strain. As a teenager, your eyes should adjust faster than those of an older adult, but it still depends on your individual circumstances. Also consider your diet — limit sugars and starches (sodas, pizza, bread, pasta, cookies) and add brightly colored vegetables and fish oil capsules.

      Reply
  22. slim934

    A quick question concerning astigmatism if you please.

    Could you provide some direction concerning how much one should try to decrease astigmatism prescription over time? For example, you seem to suggest diopter reductions on the order of about .5 diopter. Do you have any similar guideline for astigmatism?

    Reply
    • Todd

      Regarding astigmatism, check out the answer to Question 6 in the Q&A section at the end of the article.

      Reply
  23. Dmitriy

    Hi Todd,

    I would first like to say that I enjoy your site and appreciate what you are doing here. Over the last year and a half or so I have successfully reduced my myopia from -2.5 to roughly -0.75D. Currently I don’t use minus lenses for anything other than driving to unfamiliar places at night for which I use a -1D lens which gives me crystal clear sight.

    So here are a few questions for you

    1.) Were you able to fully restore your night vision? I understand factors such as increased accommodative tone, chromatic aberration and decreased field of depth contribute to night myopia and I suspect you need to be slightly hyperopic for truly excellent night vision.

    2.) Also any thoughts about wearing a +0.5D lens for distant focusing to increase stimulus once my refractive state is closer to 0.0 at least until I can develop a little bit of a hyperopic reserve.

    thanks

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Dmitry,

      Great to have another success story posting here!

      To answer your questions:
      1. Yes, my night vision is very good. Besides the print pushing that helped me reduce myopia, I think that diet played a key role — reduced sugars, fish oil, brightly colored vegetables like peppers and carrots that are rich in carotenoids.

      2. Your idea about wearing a weak plus lens even for distance focusing is great, but only to the point that you can achieve adequate focus. No point in walking around in a total blur. But what you describe is like wearing ankle weights while walking or hiking, so that when you remove them, you can hike with greater ease!

      Todd

      Reply
      • Dmitriy

        Thanks Todd,

        I will definitely try to utilize your advice regarding diet. I was thinking about wearing a weak plus for distance of 0.5D only if I plateau as my vision approaches a range of 0.25 to 0.5 D (currently I am about 0.75 to -1D). My concern is that when I reach that point it will become increasingly more difficult to improve that little bit of remaining myopia due to increased time spent in a state of accommodation while inside and not enough stimulus while outside because everything will already be relatively sharp.

        Do you feel that last little bit of myopia took longer to reverse and did you have to change anything in your routine for it?

        Was print pushing while up close your primary method throughout the whole process?

        Thanks

        Reply
        • Todd

          Sorry for the delayed reply, Dmitry.

          Yes, the last bit of myopia seems to be the hardest. (Just like losing the last 10 pounds of overweight). Probably because we become less motivated. But read the post by “Shadowfoot”, who was able to get to 20/15 vision:

          //www.tennisbs.com/2012/04/how-one-person-improved-his-vision/

          Print pushing has been an important method, but not the only one. I think distance view and taking frequent breaks are also important.

          Todd

          Reply
  24. Jessy

    I don’t understand what people do if they have like -1 myopia or under.
    I’m 27 years old and work a lot with computers and this year I notice my vision was worse (I used to have very good eyesight).
    I went to optician and he said i have -1 myopia in my left eye and 0,75 in my right. He did my glasses with 0,75 in both eyes but i’m not using them.
    What can I do to reverse my low myopia? I’m wearing a pair of +2 only to close up work in computer,but i’m a little confused with what can i do more.
    I was think about buy some contact lenses with only -0,25 to use when i go out but i don’t know if this will be beneficial. I’m also confused with the fact that some people say that if the vision is blurred,the myopia will increase and we have to get clear vision. My myopia is low and i see almost clear during the day (especially in the sun),but will be better if i get some very low mibus contacts/glasses to those ocasions?
    I hope if someone can help me with that. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Using the +2 lenses for close up work as you are doing should help, but always try to read at D2, the edge of blur, and continually push farther back. I’m not sure the weak contacts will be that useful.

      Reply
      • Chris

        Although here you recommend to “always try to read at D2” do we still follow what you wrote in the article: “You should spend the vast majority of your time reading at D1, in perfect focus, but continually (every few minutes), testing yourself by ‘pushing’ into to D2.”?

        Reply
  25. Hi Todd,
    I Got a question: How can I relieve ciliary strain after the rehab session and after close-up work?
    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Rodrigo,

      If by “the rehab session” you mean print pushing, then that is the opposite of close-up work, and should thereby counteract the ciliary strain associated with close work.

      Todd

      Reply
      • Rodrigo

        Thanks for the answer, Todd.
        One last thing:
        I’m having trouble with the last stage of myopia reduction: equalizing.
        My history is: I’ve been reducing my myopia from -1.00 L and -0.75 R since december of 2015. I used to wear my distance glasses for close up work since I was a little kid, with 9 years, because the optometrist told my parents to do so. And here I am, writing to you =/.
        Sorry about the lenght of this message: In my last measurement I got -0.50 L and -0.25 R, and I’m trying to equalize since I had had -0.75 and -0.50. What I’ve done is to execute the rehab sessions, like active focus while using a patch, with 15 minutes session per eye, on both, not only in the strong one. And I noticed that it’s not working well because I still have a -0.25 diopter of difference in each eye. I’ve also tried doing what you’ve posted in the blog: 15 minutes of patching sessions in the strong eye. The problem with this is that after a month doing so, my left eye become the stronger and the right the weaker, just the inverse. I’m really puzzled about this and I hope you can help me.

        Reply
        • Todd

          Hmm…looks like you overshot with the patching. I suppose the good news is that your focal length is sufficiently malleable that you should be able to equalize by patching the (new) strong left eye. Just check your Snellen score in each eye separately and frequently.

          Reply
  26. Enrique

    Hi Todd,
    My age is 21. And i started having myopia 3 years ago. Currently my prescription is:
    RIGHT EYE: -1.50 Cylindrical
    LEFT EYE: -2.50 Cylindrical,+0.50 Spherical

    I have started doing the print pushing technique and reading without glasses in the D2 zone. I don’t like to wear glasses so is it okay to go out on a walk or travel without my glasses? How long it might take for my vision to improve?

    Reply
  27. Hi Todd,

    I have recently seen your Youtube video on Myopia, and was enthralled and elated at the same time.

    I come from a family of Myopics, and it kind of runs on the Paternal side of my family, with high myopic corrections, required for almost every aunt, uncle and cousins.

    I feel great to know that this is something that can be actually reversed, as opposed to what I have always been led to believe by my family and ophthalmologists.

    However, I had a basic question, and apologize in case it has been asked and answered before.

    I have high Power/Number in my eyes (we call diopters as Power here – India)
    Right Eye – -8.00 / 2.50 Cylindrical
    Left Eye – -9.00/2.00 Cylindrical

    I find it difficult to do Print Pushing with the naked eye. I still feel that I am unable to get a complete focus, and have to literally bury my head in the screen to get a point of focus. I have recently been given a correction, and is it OK to Print Pushing with glasses, or it has to be done with the nakeed eye, even for people like me who have high myopia in both eyes or we can use glasses to begin with.

    Please suggest. And also, I did it today for the first time, and am not sure whether I am overdoing it or not. What is the optimal time per day, 2 to 4 hours is like a significant leap from 0 hours.

    Please help out.

    Regards,
    Ashitav

    Reply
  28. Deep

    Dear Todd,

    My Son is 10 and went from -3.00 to -4.75 on his recent eye doctor visit. Being disheartened, I started looking at alternate ways to reverse/control his myopia. I saw some videos on Bates method and read few articles on different techniques (near to far shift, palming, sunning and swinging) and i have been doing those techniques with him for about a week. Then i stumbled upon your video presentation and started talking to my son about trying “print push” method.

    Few questions to make sure i am on the right track:

    1) Would there be any harm in also continuing Bates techniques (as my son enjoys them now) along with starting on Print push?
    2) During reading, should i have him do print push with lower prescription lenses or naked eye? His D1 is about 12 inches and D2 is about 14 inches.
    3) Should we get -4:00 or -4.25 lower prescription lenses for him to wear in school during the day. What direction should we give him during school as he has to focus close and far during class? He has been talking them off when he comes home in the evenings and we do bates techniques in the evenings.

    Thank you VERY MUCH for your time and efforts

    Reply
  29. suhaib

    Hi Todd,
    Just came across your video on YouTube, it is very interesting. I am 17 with R -3.50 and L -3.75 with astigmatism of about -.5 in both eyes, and have glasses with R -3.50 and L -3.00( just got – .25 increment in left eye). I never wear my glasses continuously(i actually had myopia of about2 dioptre initially but reading with glasses worsened it to my current prescription, I realized the fact and so stopped their continuous use about a year ago) except in class and while watching TV . my question is should i continue this way or should I wear undercorrected glasses for distance vision , if yes then what should be the exact prescription i should wear ? And while print pushing if i read between d1 and d2 or at d2itself ?Waiting for your valuable comments?

    Reply
  30. Cat

    Hi. I’ve read through everything and wanted to see if you can clarify the next steps for the print pushing? This is my understanding. Can you correct if I’m misunderstanding?
    1) Try on plus lenses so that vision is at D2 at 15-20 inches away when reading to find the right plus lens for you. (quick ques – is the ideal to be at a -2 to be seeing at D2?)
    2) Keep doing this daily until vision using this plus lens gets clear
    3) Move up to next plus lens by +.25 or are at D2 again and when vision gets clear, move up to next plus lens again until you get to +2.5 or 20/20

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Todd

      Cat,

      I think you have it pretty much right. The only point I’d correct is your #2, “Keep doing this daily until vision using this plus lens gets clear”. Reading with the plus lens should always be clear — right on the edge of clear. You only occasionally test the blur to be sure you are at the edge. What changes is not the clarity, but the distance or diopters needed to achieve it.

      Todd

      Reply
  31. Camille L

    Hi Todd,

    Thank you for all the great work you’re doing. I have mild myopia and I am about to start print pushing but I’m not sure how to calculate the plus lens I should buy, and I wonder if you could help me with that, my prescription is OD -1.25 OS -1.50.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Camille,

      If you read section 4 in the answer to Question 1 in the article above, you’ll find the answer. Since your myopia is less than 2, then you need a lens that is approximately 2 – your current diopters. Hence you only need about 0.5 plus lenses to be able to print push comfortably at about half a meter (19 inches).

      But the best advice is in the article…just go to the pharmacy and try on different pairs of “readers” to find a pair that just allows you to barely focus at arms length.

      Todd

      O

      Reply
  32. Camille L

    Hi Todd,

    I already have another question. I have started print pushing, with +1.00 lenses, but it causes a strain on my right eye, the stronger one (-1.25). When I print push without plus lenses I feel confortable, even if the computer is a bit far from me. Anyway, I was wondering if print pushing without plus lenses is pointless since I have mild myopia or should I continue this way?

    Thank you very much!

    Reply
    • Todd

      You can print push without lenses if it is comfortable and practical for you.

      Reply
  33. Sam

    Hi, I e-mailed the author of the blog but maybe he gets too many e-mails so can someone help me out here.

    I have mild myopia (as the article calls it) and spend about 6-8 hours a day in front of a computer. According this method am I supposed to stay most of the day at D1 sporadically getting into D2, and then for 1 – 2 hours wear readers and stay at D2 while wearing them?

    I’d appreciate any response.

    Reply
  34. Dharini B

    Hi Todd,
    My situation is that I am short-sighted in one eye (-1.75) and can see 20/20 in the other eye.

    I have some questions about the print pushing method:

    1. If I do print pushing for 15-30 minutes a day, will my right eye improve?
    (is there a maximum/minimum amount of focus pushing to do- some people do it all day and others do it for about 15 minutes so I am a bit confused)

    2. For people starting out, it is recommended that print pushing is used for close-up activities while good vision habits are practiced. Will continuing to use full strength glasses for
    distance activities affect your vision improvement progress or do you have to get under-corrected distance glasses as well?
    (I am able to do print pushing at about 63 cm without glasses [or get plus lenses if I want to do it while reading] but I only have full strength glasses for distance use…not sure I should limit their use or get under-corrected glasses instead).

    Dharini

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Dharini. Think of print pushing as you would think of exercise in the gym, using weights or treadmill. Individuals differ in their tolerance. Beginners get sore if they start exercising too much, too quickly. Likewise, start out slowly with 15-30 minute sessions, perhaps a couple times a day. Do it while reading and it becomes less of a hassle, and more like ordinary reading. If you get tired or sore, then back off. If you can build up to a few hours a day — broken into smaller sessions — that is optimal. There is no problem combining print pushing for near work with full strength glasses for distance, though it would be preferable to gradually reduce the distance prescriptions by 0.25 to 0.5 diopters. Of course, as you find yourself improving, you’ll want to get progressively weaker distance lenses every few months. You can get inexpensive glasses online (zennioptical.com) or consider adjustable lenses (adlens.com).

      Reply
      • Dharini B

        Hi Todd,

        Thank you for your response.

        Also because my right eye has a prescription of -1.75 and my left eye has normal vision, would it help if I used under-corrected glasses of R -1.5 and L plano (if I slightly lower the prescription for my right eye, won’t I be using only the left eye to see because it has 20/20 vision)?

        I know I can patch the left eye but is this only for close-up activities but does it have to be for distance activities as well?

        Dharini

        Reply
  35. Rodrigo

    Hi Todd, are you okay? Something happened? Because you’re no longer approving comments or new forum accounts.
    Hope you are okay.
    Cheers,
    Rafael.

    Reply
    • Todd

      I’ve been up to other things for a while…just getting re-connected with the blog, and will approve Forum accounts.

      Reply
  36. Pritam

    My 4 year old son has been diagonised for short sightness and prescribed specs. Can i use the methods given by you for him.

    regards
    Pritam

    Reply
    • Todd

      Yes. But it requires great patience and persistence. Do you and your son have that?

      Reply
  37. Mary

    Hello, first I want to thank you for sharing this information. I’ve been following the method for about 15 days, trying active focus while reading and using a lower prescription while using the computer,or walking around. But I’ve noticed that my right eye (the one with more myopia: 3.75) is starting to itch from time to time, is that normal?

    Reply
    • Todd

      I don’t know about itching, haven’t heard that reported before. I’d reduce your print pushing frequency or take a break of a few days if you see redness or feel soreness.

      Reply
  38. Imran

    Hi Todd; firstly I’d like to thank you for putting this information out there and doing your best to spread the good news/help people!

    A little bit of background in terms of where I am now. I am a 24 year old medical student who has had glasses for ten years. My current prescription from the optometrist about a year ago is – 3.75 in both eyes (with – 0.75 cyl) . I would say my actual reading is about that or – 3.5 now.

    I have been reading lots of information about this technique and others in an effort to answer my own questions. However, I still have a little bit of confusion in terms of how to proceed practically in my own individual situation.

    I currently own 3 pairs of glasses, one at – 3.75, one from my late teens at around – 2 and another from when I was 14/15 at around – 1. If I am to understand correctly I want a reduced correction when on the computer or reading a book, so I go for my – 1 glasses? Or do I go for no glasses at all?

    Secondly, shall I go for my – 2 or should I order another pair (-3.25) for distance activities? Also, when doing these distance activities, does it involve actively trying to make out edges and details etc? I currently walk around without my glasses on as I have gotten used to the blur and don’t pay any mind to anything apart from my destination (if I need to read a sign, I take my glasses out). Can I continue walking about with the blur and only using glasses at specific times of the day for distance viewing?

    Thirdly, how long do you think the stretches of edge of blur reading should be (on the computer or a book)? 3/4 hours (I. E all reading I do on the computer) Or would that be too much strain?

    Finally, my concern is if I manage to succeed and get my vision back to 20/20, what if it goes back to where I am now? Could you break down a little bit of how I got here, so I can make sure I don’t return? (I understand following my first prescription at 14, the constant use of glasses to correct my myopia lead to the worsening, but how? How did it start? From doing a lot of closeup reading? Because I will have to do a lot of that for the rest of my career)

    Thank you!

    Reply
  39. Nishan

    Hi Todd,
    While print pushing, are we reading at D1 or D2? How long can we read at D1 and D2, please clarify.
    Also, while reducing the prescription lense, do we need to make same diopter for both eyes. I have -2.5 in Right eye and -2.75 in left eye. Is it ok to lower the prescription by 0.5 in both eyes and making -2 in both eyes or -2 in Right and -2.25 in left eye.
    Please reply me and help me to solve this query.
    Please answe the above both questions.
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Todd

      In print pushing, you alternate between D1 and D2, constantly testing yourself to be sure you are reading at the very edge of sharp focus. You can read at this distance for hours, but you should still take frequent breaks every 15-30 minutes.

      You do not need the same correction in both eyes, because your eyes are different. But if there are as close as yours, then practically speaking you do not need different lenses. Because your myopia is stronger than -2, you can print push without lenses, by adjusting how far back from your book or computer you sit.

      Watch the video and review the slides here for further details:

      //www.tennisbs.com/2014/08/myopia-a-modern-yet-reversible-disease/

      Reply
  40. momina

    i am sorry but can you please explain the D1 D2 D3 distances with pictures because i do not understand them at all please its really confusing .I really dont want to wear glasses and i have minor myopia and hopefully i can recover my eyesigh.please suggest me a way to understand this better i dont get it at alll

    Reply
  41. Minsarul

    Hello Todd I m minsarul
    Here are a few questions pls answer:

    1)What dioptres of plus lenses should I wear if my prescription is -1.75 on both eyes? At what distance should I print push?

    2) After reading with plus lenses for two hours what glasses should I wear for further reading?

    3) What will happen if I do not wear weaker minus lenses but wear -1.75 throughout the day?

    Pls reply as soon as possible. Myopia is annoying me.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Minsarul,

      As the table in the post indicates, at -1.75 diopters, your vision without glasses starts to blur at between 20-26 inches — probably around 23 inches (58 centimeters). Test yourself to see if that is right. In any case, that is the distance at which you should print push.

      After reading for 2 hours, take a break and go back to either wearing your normal lenses for a while (but not too long), or preferably a slightly weaker pair of lenses (0.5 diopters weaker).

      If you wear the normal -1.75 glasses all the time, you won’t reduce your myopia.

      Todd

      Reply
  42. I work around 50 hours a day at a restaurant and also do deliveries for both that job as well as on the side with gig jobs, which means I’m concerned about driving safely. What are your suggestions on what I’d need to do in order to stay safe on the road whilst I get my eyes back on track?

    I still happen to have the three previous glasses I’ve progressively gotten since I was 7 or eight and each still fit me well. Would those work well in keeping the eyes focused at the “new” higher levels?

    Reply
  43. Hey Todd,

    I tried posting before but I don’t think it went through. My question is regarding driving and what I need to do about that while reversing myopia. I work about 50 hours a week at a restaurant and at times also take deliveries for that job as well as delivering for a side job. I want to ensure that I’m staying safe while driving, so I’d like your recommendation on what to do.

    I still have the previous glasses, minus the one I got as a child, with the lower prescriptions and they still fit, so would those be beneficial for such a matter?

    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Tim,

      My suggestion is to do what I did for driving: gradually progress through your weaker prescriptions, starting with the most recent (strongest) one. Test to make sure you can see ahead a sufficient number of car lengths. When the road is clear, periodically and briefly focus on objects at the edge of focus — road signs, trees, objects with sharp borders. But don’t try that when there is traffic that requires your close attention!

      Combine this with print pushing while doing close work at the computer, or reading books. And you’ll gain from both activities.

      Todd

      Reply
      • Timothy Reynolds

        Thank you for the response! My next question is regarding contacts. At the time I made that post, I was still wearing glasses but they were beginning to chip in the lenses, but at my last appointment I didn’t get new glasses and instead got contacts as they were cheaper to get instead of the glasses at the time. What should my method with contacts be?

        I look forward to hearing from you again soon.

        Reply
        • Todd

          Hi Tim,

          Contacts are a little harder to work with, since you don’t want to be constantly popping them in and out. I think the best plan is to obtain contacts that are under-corrected by about 0.5 diopter, to use for distance vision in normal life — going for walks, watching TV, etc. For close up work, you can wear plus lens glasses OVER your contacts to stimulate active focusing. Select the plus lenses (from the pharmacy reader glasses rack) so that you can focus crisply on a book or screen at comfortable distance (maybe 18-24″ away), then sit or push back an ADDITIONAL 6-12″ to do print pushing at the edge of focus, as per the standard print pushing method in the video.

          Reply
  44. minsarul

    Hi Todd thank you for your reply.

    My brother is also myopic. His power of left eye is 5.25 D and right eye is 4.75.
    a)At what distance he should print push?

    b)How much time it will take to recover completely if he is 16 years old?
    Please reply as soon as possible.

    Minsarul

    Reply
    • Todd

      Hi Minsarul,

      As you can see from the table in the article, the print pushing distance is 39.4 divided by diopters. So using the average diopter power of your brother, he should print push (without glasses) at about 39.4/5 = 8 inches. That may be very close and uncomfortable to read so close up, so he can instead just get some glasses that are about 2 diopters weaker than his prescription, i.e. 3.25D and 2.75S, and print push with these at around 20 inches.

      Recovery time is impossible to predict. It depends a lot on your level of consistency, age, and genetics, but especially on how strong your myopia is when starting. Your brother has very strong myopia. He can make rapid improvements in a few months, but full recovery to normal eyesight might take several years.

      Todd

      Reply
  45. Amit Sarkar

    Hello Sir,
    I have watched your lecture on “Myopia a modern yet reversible disease.”
    It is a excellent video.

    I have Myopia.
    R-6.75
    L-4.50
    With cylinder.

    I am a student. And I have study about 10-12 hours daily.
    I done print pushing without my glasses for study. Is it right to study without glasses all the day?

    Can I use plus lenses for study?

    I know you have said that it would take time to rebuild my eye.
    But I want to know what is the right and best method for that kind of prescription?

    Sir please please please reply…

    Reply
    • Todd

      Yes, you can use plus lenses for study. But take frequent breaks, and stop for a while if your eyes get tired or so. Be patient. You will likely see some reduction in your prescription within a few months, but it may take years, and several weaker prescriptions, before you eliminate your myopia.

      Reply

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